Saturday, 30 March 2013

Goa & its Paradox



Apart from tourism, Goa is known for mining, especially Iron ore. But the state of affairs is pathetic.

Facts about mining in Goa:
In the state of Goa, 7 Talukas of the 12 in are mining regions, but iron ore is mined the most in Bicholim, Sattari, Sanguem and Quepem.

Surprisingly 8% to 15% of Goa’s total land area of 3,702 sq km is occupied by mining activity, but its contribution to the state’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is less than 5%.

There are 91 active mining leases in Goa. They are all in private hands. Not a single public sector firm is involved in mining in the state.



Nearly 15,000 trucks are used by the mining industry in Goa to transport Iron ore to jetties and about 300 barges are used to take the ore to the ports for export.



Corruption and mismanagement by successive governments and companies, including illegal mining is the main cause of the present situation Goa finds itself in.

With Manohar Parrikar at the helm of affairs, most Goans feel a sense of hope. But will he be able to sort out the well entrenched business packed with corrupt practices?

With booming tourism and mining under proper government policies will boost the economy of the state and drive it on the road to success making it a progressive state with sound economics. 

Monday, 25 March 2013

Bharata, My Brother


Available: Bharata's story in the epic Ramayana
Months in the making and now ready for the readers.



Bharata, My Brother
'A remarkable exposition of the relationship between the two brothers, Rama and Bharata.
Provides a glimpse of Ramayana in a simple form with a focus on Bharata's episode in the great epic.'    

A book that was reasonably praised for its narrative. Bharata is the central character of the book and is inspiring. The book has interesting sketches to help your imagination. And it reads simply of the Indian mythology as told in the Ramayana. Interesting nuggets of information about Bharata, lesser-known significant places in India and other mythological references make it informative to students and others. The verses are soaked in divine mysticism.

This is an engaging book and recommended.


Bharata, My Brother

-Bharata's episode in Ramayana in simple verse form.


Including Ramayana: story in brief & Bharata's profile.

Written by: Anil Kumar Naik

Foreword: 
Shri Asaranna Swami, Durga Parmeshwari temple,Kateel, Karnataka.

Order your copy today.
Price: Rs 200 + P&F Rs 50 (India)
         $20 (Overseas)

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Sunday, 24 March 2013

Lingo Bingo & Sailor’s woe!






In one of the Hindi movies, Amitabh Bacchan says, English is a funny language..... And I remember one of my Professors in college once said, In English your father's brother is uncle, and mom's brother too is uncle. Your mom's sister is aunty and so is your dad's sister. When you say uncle or aunty, one doesn't know whom you are referring to. Whereas in Hindi and other Indian regional languages, they are called differently. Similarly there are number of examples of how funny English language is! And to add to the confusion, have some silent alphabets in some words.

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Many years ago, my friend’s cousin arrived in Mumbai from Vizag. He had done a radio operators course. He joined a shipping company and was appointed a radio operator in one of their merchant ships sailing on the high seas. Being a simple boy from a small town was indeed overwhelmed by Mumbai and more so at seeing the new places in foreign countries, the ship anchored at the ports to pick up and download cargo.




And once during his regular sailing, the ship anchored at a port in UK. The ship was to anchor there for a few days. The sailors were allowed to disembark and tour the town, a new experience for my friend’s cousin. And luckily he had a old friend in the city. As he walked around, he remembered he had to buy something. He entered a store and asked the English shopkeeper for a match box. The owner of the store, an old man said, ‘No, no.’ My friend’s cousin was surprised though he could see the stock of match boxes kept neatly on the shelf, the old man said no. He decide to ask him again. ‘Sir match box please.’ The old man got irritated and grumbled, ‘no, I told you so.’ My friend’s cousin though confused, did not give up, decided to make one more final attempt. He pointed to the shelf where the boxes were stocked and asked, ‘match box sir.’ The old man turned around and said, ‘hey man, you want box of matches?’ and my friend’s cousin nodded. The old man had a hearty laugh and my friend’s cousin shyly took the match and walked away. He was still confused about the English language and the old man at the store.

After returning to India, I heard my friend’s cousin arguing with my friend, ‘Tell me, what’s the difference between a match box and box of matches? These Englishmen make simple things complicated!’ We all had a hearty laugh.
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Smiling is a sign of happiness

Smiling can boost your mood and even your immune system. Keep enjoying reading for more fascinating facts about our smiles.

Forcing yourself to smile can boost your mood: Psychologists have found that even if you’re in bad mood, you can instantly lift your spirits by forcing yourself to smile.

It boosts your immune system: Smiling really can improve your physical health, too. Your body is more relaxed when you smile, which contributes to good health and a stronger immune system.

Smiles are contagious: It’s not just a saying: smiling really is contagious, scientists say. In a study conducted in Sweden, people had difficulty frowning when they looked at other subjects who were smiling, and their muscles twitched into smiles all on their own.

Smiles relieve Stress: Your body immediately releases endorphins when you smile, even when you force it. This sudden change in mood will help you feel better and release stress.

It’s easier to smile than to frown: Scientists have discovered that your body has to work harder and use more muscles to frown than it does to smile.

It’s a universal sign of happiness: While hand shakes, hugs, and bows all have varying meanings across cultures, smiling is known around the world and in all cultures as a sign of happiness and acceptance.

We still smile at work: While we smile less at work than we do at home, 30% of subjects in a research study smiled five to 20 times a day, and 28% smiled over 20 times per day at the office.

Smiles use from 5 to 53 facial muscles: Just smiling can require your body to use up to 53 muscles, but some smiles only use 5 muscle movements.

Babies are born with the ability to smile: Babies learn a lot of behaviors and sounds from watching the people around them, but scientists believe that all babies are born with the ability, since even blind babies smile.

Smiling helps you get promoted: Smiles make a person seem more attractive, sociable and confident, and people who smile more are more likely to get a promotion.

Smiles are the most easily recognizable facial expression: People can recognize smiles from up to 300 feet away, making it the most easily recognizable facial expression.

Women smile more than men: Generally, women smile more than men, but when they participate in similar work or social roles, they smile the same amount. This finding leads scientists to believe that gender roles are quite flexible. Boy babies, though, do smile less than girl babies, who also make more eye contact.

Smiles are more attractive than makeup: A research study conducted by Orbit Complete discovered that 69% of people find women more attractive when they smile than when they are wearing makeup.

There are 19 different types of smiles: UC-San Francisco researcher identified 19 types of smiles and put them into two categories: polite “social” smiles which engage fewer muscles, and sincere “felt” smiles that use more muscles on both sides of the face.

Babies start smiling as newborns: Most doctors believe that real smiles occur when babies are awake at the age of four-to-six weeks, but babies start smiling in their sleep as soon as they’re born.


   
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Thursday, 21 March 2013

Insuring Boobs & Bottoms – indeed an interesting biz!


Celebrities insure their body parts. Do you know the biggest insurance policies stars and celebrities have taken on theirbody parts; The absurdity of Hollywood stars getting their assets insured for staggering amounts. Celebrities who insured their body parts for millions.........

Jennifer Lowe Hewitt
While ordinary people generally limit their insurance expenditure to their life, homes, cars, travel and pets, but celebrities insure their body parts. You must have heard about sportsmen and celebrities insuring different parts of the body that is most precious or the most talked about assets. Recently Jennifer Love Hewitt has revealed she would like to insure her impressive 36C breasts for $5 million. The ample-endowed 34-year-old said: ‘If somebody was like, ‘Hey, you know what? We would like to insure your boobs for $2 million, ‘I would be like, ‘Do it. Love it. Why not?’ These things are right here are worth 45 million!’ Hewitt isn’t the first celebrity to ensure her prominent parts are protected. Likes of Rihanna and Jamie Lee Curtis took out policies worth $1 million and $2.8 million respectively to safeguard their legs.

The craze was kicked off by Hollywood star Betty Crable, who insured her pins in the 1940s for $1 million. David Lee Roth turned heads in his heyday when he took out a $1 million policy on his sperms.

Biggest insurance policies stars and celebrities have taken on body parts; Celebrities who insured their body parts for millions:

Jennifer Lopez insured her butt
Jennifer Lopez insured her substantial posterior for $27 million. Heidi Klum insured her toned pins for $2.2 million. Singer Dolly Parton has insured each of her breasts for $3.8 million. Guitarist of Rolling Stone, Keith Richards insured his hands for $1.6 million. Super model Heidi Klum insured her legs for $2.2 million. Rod Stewarts insured his voice for $6 million. Tom Jones insured his chest hair for $7 million. David Beckham insured his legs for $70 million. 

Mariah Carey insured her legs
Mariah Carey insured her shapely legs for $ 1 billion. Dancer Michael Flatley insured his feet for $40 million. Australian cricketer Merv Hughes insured his impressive mustache for $317,000. Actress Ornella Muti insured her ample boobs for $350,000. Singer Tina Turner insured her legs for $3.2 million. Actress America Ferrera insured her attractive smile for $3.2 million. Footballer Cristiano Ronaldo insured his legs for $144 million. Julia Roberts insured her alluring smile for $30 million. Singer Bruce Springsteen insured his vocal cords for $ 6 million. Kylie Minogue insured her bottoms for $5 million. Madonna insured her boobs for $2 million and Holly Madison insured hers for $1 million.

Interesting titbits:
Betty Davis: Among the earliest insurers, Betty Davis got her waistline secured for $28,000 in the '40s. She was followed by the country singer Dolly Parton.

Dolly Parton: She in the '70s who valued her 40DD bosom at $600,000, which when adjusted to inflation, comes up to around $2million today.

Bruce Springsteen: Twenty-time Grammy-winning The Boss had his distinctive voice insured for a $6 million by the Llyod's of London in the '80s.

Heidi Klum: When the ex-Victoria's Secret angel decided to get her legs insured, the left one didn't match uo to the right one's value due to a tiny knee scar. Her right leg is insured for $1.2 million.

Julia Roberts: The Pretty Woman's infectious smile has inspired the world to write songs. No, it can literally be called the $30 million smile!

America Ferrera: The Ugly Betty actress had her teeth insured for $10 million by a toothpaste company she worked with on a charity campaign to help unemployed women get dental care.

Jennifer Lopez: JLo loves her derriere so much that she insured it for $27 million and wrote a song called Booty about it with Oz rapper leggy Azalea.

Keith Richards: The Rolling Stones guitarist's magic fingers are the stuff of rock n roll legend. While it's known that his hand is covered for $1.6 million, many believe it's only the middle fingure he is keen to protect.

Holly Madison: Hugh Hefner's ex-girlfriend had her breasts insured for $1 million when she starred in a Las Vegas show with her two very expensive co-stars.

Insurance companies are happy with the celebrities and the premium they pay. The celebrities are happy that their vital body part or precious asset is well protected, for which they are successful and famous world over.

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Chittorgarh Fort in Rajastha, India

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Tuesday, 19 March 2013

Goa & Manohar Parrikar



Goans feel he is the right man for the job. Some even say, he is a right man in the wrong party! He is the only IIT graduate Chief Minister in India. But how has he fared in the last one year – has Goa made any headway after misrule for many years? Is their hope for the state?

Goa has always seen unstable governments, with MLAs switching sides for personal gain. The BJP accused the previous Congress government, saying they had left the state in a real bad shape. Corruption was rampant at every level in government departments. The illegal iron ore mining had hit the state hard where it hurts the most and the administration is as good as none. Has anything changed?

Announcing: ‘Because Goa deserves’, Manohar Parrikar became Chief Minister of Goa a year ago and he inherited many problems as alleged by BJP bosses. Has he been able to grapple with the situation and ground realities? Has he been an effective leader and Chief Minister of Goa? Replying to a journalist, when asked, how he would rate his achievement so far? He said, ‘I am quite satisfied. When there is a lot of money involved, a lot of mudslinging takes place, several rumors are spread and wrong impressions are put out.’


Manohar Parrikar came to power a year ago on the promise of providing clean and efficient administration to India’s smallest state which is well know for its natural beauty and tourism, which generates about 22 per cent of revenue. Tourists from all over the world come to Goa to experience the place, food and culture.

Some point out, Parrikar has tried to do it all by himself. With a team of young and inexperienced cabinet colleagues, Manohar Parrikar, a two-time former Chief Minister has refused to delegate responsibility. ‘When a minister is approached with an issue or a file, he will invariably say, ‘let’s go to the Chief Minister,’ complained an entrepreneur.

No doubt, the Chief Minister has a huge workload. He loads 5 portfolios, including the important finance, home and mines. According to sources close to government, an official mentioned, ‘He even calls for meetings that department secretaries should, bulldozes his minister and gets upset if criticized.’

He has been targeted by the industry too, who claim, a year into his tenure, the promise of a policy to increase investments and generate revenue and jobs is still to happen. Goa’s industrial sector compromises less than 1 per cent of the national average. There is a genuine concern in business and industry. ‘We need to take a serious look at where the state is heading. If we loose investment opportunities to other states, it will be a great disservice to the next generation,’ feels Manguirish Pai Raikar, president, Goa Chamber of Commerce & Industry.

It was an accepted fact when he came to power that the task was enormous and it would not be that easy to clean up things in a fixed time period. However his successful attempt to bring the International Festival of Films of India to Goa in 2004 was welcome; which suggests things have started to move.

Mining has been a boon as well as a cause for concern in Goa. Illegal mining and the losses it caused the state was the biggest hurdle. In 2011, the Public Accounts Committee led by Parrikar who had aggressively taken on the previous Congress government and used the scam as one of his main election planks – had estimated the loss at Rs 400 crore. The Parliament appointed MB Shah Commission of enquiry put the loss at Rs 35,000 crore. The Supreme Court has put an interim ban on the operation of 90 mines thereby putting a halt on revenue of the state’s total revenue of Rs 8,700 crore; about 20-25 per cent comes from mining. Blaming the previous Congress government for the mess, the Manohar Parrikar government has filed an affidavit, asking for Supreme Court’s stay order to be vacated.

Realizing this, to bring down dependency on only mining, the state government has decided to energise other sectors - agriculture, horticulture and animal husbandry. Also on the anvil is a change in the image of Goa tourism. And the government is also working on a plan of transforming Goa into an education and IT hub. If this goes through, Goa would be on the right path of growth.

Goa known for its laid back attitude is bound to change sooner or later and Manohar Parrikar may be credited for making a real genuine attempt to bring about a change for the better for Goa and its people.



Thursday, 14 March 2013

The Story of Milagres Church in Mangalore




Milagres Church is a Roman Catholic church dedicated to Our Lady of Miracles, situated in the heart of Mangalore city. Established in the year 1680 by Bishop Thomas de Castro, it is one of the oldest churches in Dakshina Kannada. While the Church itself is a magnificent piece of art; there’s more to it than just that; it is a place where Mother Mary’s devotees come from far and near to venerate her. This Church in the heart of the city stands tall; if it does so it is because of the industrious nature of its past parishioners and the Goan, European and Mangalorean priests who have rendered unstinted service to the church during the 339 years of its existence....

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The Milagres Church located in the city centre, in Hampankaata, Mangalore has a long history; the Portuguese called it: Igreja Nossa Senhora do Milagres, and now known as Church of Our Lady of Miracles is a historic Roman Catholic Church built many times over. The Church was first built in 1680 by Bishop Thomas de Castro. The original structure (1680-1784) was constructed at the site of the present day cemetery. It is one of the oldest churches in South Kanara.


History:
Mangalore has a substantial Roman Catholic population and Mangalore occupied a prominent place in the church administration in the 17th century. However, the Goan Catholics who migrated to Canara and most of the migrant priests returned to Goa when the Portuguese withdrew from the region. In 1658, a Carmelite missionary, Fr Vincento Maria de Santa Catharina visited Canara and reported to Rome the miserable state of Christianity in the region. The Vatican came to the aid of the Canara Christians and appointed Bishop Thomas de Castro as the Vicar Apostolic of Canara and Malabar in 1674. He arrived in Mangalore in 1677, and received a piece of land from Keladi Queen Chennamma as gift. After the church was constructed in 1680, he took up residency in the quarters. Bishop de Castro died on 16 July 1684, and his remains were buried in the south eastern corner of the cemetery. The grave still exists with a bronze slab, next to the St Monica Chapel.



After the death of the Queen Chennamma, the land was taken back by her successor, King Basavappa. In 1715, a local priest Fr Pinto secured the land back again from Somashekara II. His nephew Fr Alfred Pinto who succeeded him, built a new church at the present site in 1756. In 1763, Canara came under the control of Hyder Ali and his son Tipu Sultan in 1782. It is said, believing that the local Christians            had conspired against him along with British during the second Anglo-Mysore War, Tipu captured around 60,000 Mangalorean Catholics on Ash Wednesday, on 24 February 1784 and herded them to his capital at Srirangapatanam and kept them prisoners. He also destroyed 27 churches including Milagres Church.

Present structure:
After Tipu Sultan was killed by the British during the Fourth Anglo-Mysore War on 4 May 1799, the Mangalorean Catholics were freed from captivity and returned to Mangalore. Among the returnees was a baker, Lawrence Bello, who built a chapel to replace the demolished church on the same site at the cost of Rs 400. Fr Mendez, the Vicar Apostolic secured the necessary furniture, and together with Tipu’s former munshi Salvador Pinto, raised funds and obtained a grant of Rs 600 from the government to build the church. He laid the foundation stone for a new spacious church in 1811. In 1911 the fa├žade of the church collapsed following which the then incumbent Parish priest Fr Frank Periera erected the present church with Fr Dimanti SJ as the architect. A portico was added later to the structure. Today though old, Milagres church stands tall reminding all of the history and growth of the city of Mangalore. It is a prominent structure in Mangalore though many tall buildings have come up around, that reminds you of the struggle of the people to keep their faith live against various odds.

Also read:     Our Lady of Immaculate Conception Church, Goa

The Velankanni Basilica, Velankanni




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Olive oil can do wonders
A study published in the journal Molecular cell, suggests that it is the fat in olive oil which activates a pathway in cells known to increase lifespan and prevent aging-related diseases. According to researchers, merely consuming olive oil is not enough to elicit all the health benefits.

The study also found that following a Mediterrean diet for a year could help keep the mind sharp and reduce fraility in old age.The Mediterrean diet which is commonly referred to as heart-healthy way of eating, has been linked to a number of potential health benefits. Researchers have found that olive oil in their diet may hold the key to improving lifespan and mitigating aging-related diseases, a compound called resveratrol.



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Vellore Fort, Tamilnadu, India
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Sunday, 10 March 2013

Say Tata before flying!


Are the happy days here again? Is Tata doing the right thing at the wrong time? This is not the best time to launch another airline in India. The economy is not very conducive and aviation industry is a hard taskmaster and a tricky business. Many airlines, including in India have accumulated huge amounts of aviation losses. Besides some of the government policies that too contributed to this – high taxes on jet fuel, restriction on flying abroad, etc are still prevalent as a road block to the smooth flying of the industry. And Tata has entered aviation at this troubled time; but the Tatas’ venture with AirAsia gives cause for optimism and confidence to themselves and others in the field. But are Tatas’ doing the right thing at the wrong time and succeed? Only time will tell.
In 1932, JRD Tata started Tata Airlines to deliver first government mail. This hugely successful airline was among the first businesses taken over by the government of independent India. Air India, a government enterprise and Maharaja was a symbol of fast developing India. Over the past two decades the Indian skies have been opened to private airlines. Many have come and gone, some have stuck on bravely. JRD’s successor Ratan Tata remained aloof as government regulations and taxes made flying an un-lucrative proposition. Presently only a few airlines are still flying, with the fate of liquor baron Vijay Mallaya’s Kingfisher Airlines which promised a rich flying experience is well known to all. Now eager to draw foreign investment into the already beleaguered industry, the government has not allowed red tape or other technicalities to come in the way of a clearance for AirAsia, a Malayasian low-cost carrier to set up an airline with the Tata group. The FDI policy announced last September allows foreign airlines to buy stakes in local ones; and the Foreign investment Promotion Board decided on the first proposal in aviation since the latest rules were applicable.

Tatas’ stake in the proposed airline is 30% and AirAsia’s presence in the country is restricted to coastal airports to carry budget-conscious Indians to holiday destinations in south-east Asia. The new carrier’s India plans are yet to emerge clear, but the emphasis would be on low cost travel. Bon voyage AirAsia in India!

Tuesday, 5 March 2013

Mahathobhara Sri Mangaladevi Temple






Even to this day, the two major temples of Mangaladevi and Kadri in Mangalore maintain their connection. The hermits of Kadri Yogirajmutt visit Mangaladevi temple on the first days of Kadri temple festival and offer prayer and silk clothes to the deity as a mark of respect. The city of Mangalore is named after the presiding deity goddess Mangaladevi. She is the main deity of the temple, built in the memory of the princess of Malabar, Mangale in the 10th century. Mangala is worshipped as Shakti....

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Mangalore is one of the prominent cities on the west coast of Karnataka derives its name from the local deity, Mangaladevi. The ancient Mahathobhara Sri Mangaladevi temple is located in the south west of the city, in the suburb of Bolar. It is revered by the Mangaloreans. Locals and Mangaloreans settled in different parts of Karnataka, India and other countries come here to pay their respects and pray for the well being of their family and loved ones. Visitors, tourists, ardent devotees and Mangaloreans from around the world and based in different parts of the country make it a point to visit and seek her blessings.


Legend:
The temple dates back to the ninth century, when Kundavarma, the ruler and king of the Alepa dynasty was ruling the region known as Tulu Nadu, which means the land of the Tuluvas. During this period, two holy saints of the Nath cult, Machhendranath and Goraknath, who had come all the way from Nepal; they reached Mangalore after crossing the river Nethravathi. The place where they crossed the river is known as Gorakdandi, the place near the banks of the river which once was the hermitage and centre of learning of the sage Kapila.


On hearing about the arrival of the two saints, the king proceeded to meet them. Introducing himself as the king of the region known as Tulu Nadu, he paid them his respects and offered them patronage. Pleased with the humility and virtues of the king, they suggested to him that the kingdom needed to be sanctified. They requested him to grant them land so as to build a hermitage and make it a centre for their religious activities under his protection and patronage. The ancient history surprised the king. He then came to know that his land was dedicated to Mangaladevi. It was from these saints he came to know that once upon a time there existed a temple in his land dedicated to Mangaladevi. From his own mother, he had heard the story of Vihasini and Andasura, Parashurama and the temple built by them. The two saints took the king to the sites where all these historical events had taken place. They asked the king to dig the place and retrieve the lingam and the dharapatra, symbolizing Mangaladevi and install them in a shrine along with Nagaraja for providing protection.



King Kundavarma obediently carried out the advice of the two sages. A grand shrine devoted to Mangaladevi was built on the hallowed place. The two sages themselves supervised the execution of the work. The temple attained special significance as Mangaladevi granted special favours, specially unmarried young women, who worshipped the goddess by observing Mangaladharavrata, and she fulfilled their wish of a suitable match for the unmarried women. A lot of ardent female devotees visit the temple to seek her blessings. Fridays see a large number of devotees and the temple is crowded with people offering special pujas and other offerings for the Goddess.


Even to this day, the two major temples of Mangaladevi and Kadri in Mangalore maintain their connection. The hermits of Kadri Yogirajmutt visit Mangaladevi temple on the first day of Kadri temple festival and offer prayer and silk clothes to the deity.The Goddess Mangaladevi gives the city of Mangalore its name. She is the main deity of the temple, built in the memory of the princess of Malabar, Mangale in the 10th century. Mangala is worshipped as Shakti. Mangaloreans have great faith in her, and whenever in Mangalore make it a point to pray for their, as well as the well being of the near and dear ones. And many devotees come to thank the deity on their wish being fulfilled. The temple has retained the old-world charm which give the devotees a special feeling.

Kadri Manjunath Temple
Apart from the devotees, many tourists and people from other parts of Karnataka and all over India come to pray and pay their respects. People donate in cash and kind and also present silk saris to the deity for special pujas to be performed on their behalf. These are adorned on the deity on certain days. Normally on Fridays a large number of devotees come to pray. The temple is crowded.


Festivals:
Chariot of Mangaladevi:
On the occasion of Navaratri during Dussera, special pujas are performed on all nine days. On the seventh day, goddess Mangaladevi is worshiped as Sharadamba and on the eighth day, the goddess is worshiped as Maarikamba. On this day Aayuda puja is performed. All weapons and tools are worshiped as the day marks the slaying of the demons by goddess Durga. On the ninth day also known as Mahanavmi, a large number of devotees participate in the Rathothsava. The decorated goddess is mounted on the grand chariot and pulled with thick ropes. The procession goes round Marnamikatte where the goddess is worshiped and then taken back in great pomp and festivity. The colourful crowd, young and old and tourists gathered, cheer the deity all the way.

Ganeshotsav:
Ganeshotsav is also celebrated with much grandeur in the temple. A huge statue of Lord Ganesh is erected on the day of Ganesh Chaturthi. The statue is taken out in a procession on the third day and is immersed at Uppinakote near Hoige Bazaar.        

How to reach the temple:      
The temple is situated just 3 km from the heart of Mangalore city (Hampankatte) and Mangalore railway station. Frequent buses are available. Auto rickshaws are also available from the station and the city centre.



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Hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia?

Hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia, one of the longest words in the dictionary, is ironically the fear of long words. Considered as a social phobia. The symptoms may trigger when a person sees a long word and experiences a great deal of fear and anxiety.


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Kumbalgarh Fort in Rajasthan, India

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